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Jobs and Economic Development

Bob Krist and Lynne Walz understand the importance of a job, not only to an individual, but to the family that job supports.  As small businesspersons, they understand first-hand how government can help, or hurt, job creation.

In 2001 Pete Rickets, as COO at Ameritrade laid off 600 employees and that year was given a bonus of $150,000. In 2003, he fired 400 employees and received a bonus of $277,000. And when Ameritrade merged with T.D. Waterhouse, the agreement stated that up to 1,500 employees would be laid off while Pete Ricketts would receive a bonus of 7 million dollars.

Old news?

When ConAgra moved its corporate headquarters from Omaha to Chicago, the silence you heard from the governor’s office was deafening. And when Cabela’s was forced to merge with Brass Pro Shop, and as a result abandon its headquarters in Sidney, Nebraska and leaving hundreds unemployed, crickets were much louder than Ricketts.

Unfortunately, Pete Ricketts has been so focused on pushing policies that would benefit himself and his billionaire friends that he doesn’t seem to care about average Nebraskans and small businesses.

Bob Krist and Lynne Walz understand the importance of a job, not only to an individual but to the family that job supports. And as small businesspersons, they understand first-hand how government can help, or hurt, job creation.

They understand that key to a good job begins with a good education, from K-12 to our community colleges and universities, to apprenticeships and other job-training programs. Education leads to innovation and entrepreneurial activity, which will help create new start-ups and small businesses that will help Nebraska’s economy grow.

In addition, they know first-hand that government regulations need to be streamlined to promote job growth, and that targeted incentives for job creation have a role to play in our new economy, particularly among small entrepreneurs.

The Krist-Walz administration understands the need to expand rural broadband, complete our four-lane state-highway system, and invest in our University research programs. 

Krist-Walz also understands that individuals and businesses measure more than tax incentives when deciding where to locate, or where they want to work. Quality of life measured by such factors as quality of local schools, diversity, entertainment, outdoor activities, transportation, and social acceptance are factors that are important in deciding economic growth.